Certified Programs


NCCER Certification

OSHA 10/30 Hour

Construction Technology

The OSHA Outreach Training Program provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces. The program also provides information regarding workers' rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint. This is a voluntary program and does not meet training requirements for any OSHA standards.

Through this program, workers can attend 10-hour or 30-hour classes delivered by OSHA-authorized trainers. The 10-hour class is intended to provide workers with awareness of common job-related safety and health hazards, while the 30-hour class is more appropriate for supervisors or workers with some safety responsibility. Through this training, OSHA helps to ensure that workers are more knowledgeable about workplace hazards and their rights, and contribute to our nation's productivity.
This curriculum will ground the trainee in the basic knowledge and principles of carpentry, masonry, concrete finishing, electrical work, HVAC, and plumbing. He or she will become skilled in different phases of a project from start to finish. Once completing this course, the trainee will be able to interpret construction drawings; perform quality concrete and brickwork; frame walls, ceilings, and floors of a structure; and install the proper wiring and piping for electrical, and plumbing systems.

There are no additional or special requirements for instructors to be certified to teach Construction Technology. However, instructors for this program typically have work experience in residential construction or remodeling. General contractors or someone with construction experience that involves some knowledge of multiple crafts are ideal instructors for this program.
NCCER is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) education foundation created in 1996 as The National Center for Construction Education and Research. It was developed with the support of more than 125 construction CEOs and various association and academic leaders who united to revolutionize training for the construction industry. Sharing the common goal of developing a safe and productive workforce, these companies created a standardized training and credentialing program for the industry. This progressive program has evolved into curricula for more than 70 craft areas and a complete series of more than 70 assessments offered in over 4,000 NCCER-accredited training and assessment locations across the United States.

NCCER develops standardized construction and maintenance curriculum and 
assessments with portable credentials. These credentials are tracked through NCCER’s Registry System that allows organizations and companies to track the qualifications of their craft professionals and/or check the qualifications of possible new hires. NCCER's Registry System also assists craft professionals by maintaining their records in a secure database.

NCCER’s workforce development process of accreditation, instructor certification, standardized curriculum, registry, assessment and certification is a key component in the industry’s workforce development efforts. NCCER also drives multiple initiatives to enhance career development and recruitment efforts for the industry, primarily through its Build Your Future initiative.

Electrical

Career in Construction

Electricians install electrical systems in structures; they install wiring and other electrical components, such as circuit breaker panels, switches, and light fixtures, and they follow blueprints, the National Electrical Code® and state and local codes.

To prepare trainees a career in the electrical field, NCCER offers a comprehensive, 4-level Electrical curriculum that complies with DOL time-based standards for apprenticeship.

The eight edition of Electrical has also been fully updated to the 2014 NEC® and includes revisions to the module examinations.
NCCER's Careers in Construction showcases the world of construction and career opportunities available to anyone interested in pursuing a construction career. The guide includes a variety of pictures and illustrations as it reviews the pride and excitement of a construction career.  This exceptionally produced trainee guide features a highly illustrated design, technical hints and tips from industry experts, review questions and a whole lot more!

Key content includes: Construction - America's Powerhouse Industry, Consider a Career in Construction, Is Construction for You?, Career Guide: Carpenter - Plumber - Electrician - Mason - HVAC Technician - Electronic Systems Technician - Welder- Heavy Equipment Operator - Other Trades, How Do I Get Started, and Sources of Information.

Plumbing

Most people are familiar with plumbers who come to their home to unclog a drain or install an appliance. In addition to these activities, however, plumbers install, maintain, and repair many different types of pipe systems. For example, some systems move water to a municipal water treatment plant and then to residential, commercial, and public buildings. Other systems dispose of waste, provide gas to stoves and furnaces, or supply air conditioning. Pipe systems in power plants carry the steam that powers huge turbines. Pipes also are used in manufacturing plants, such as wineries, to move material through production processes.

NCCER’s four-level curriculum covers topics such as Plumbing Tools, Types of Valves, and Potable Water Treatment

Certified Programs

Welding

Safety Orientation

Project Management

Welding is a high-tech industry that can take you places all over the world. From ladders to aircraft carriers, from NASCAR to national defense, and from the laboratory to sales and repair, the varied welding industry impacts virtually every industry.

Technology is creating more uses for welding in the workplace. For example, new ways are being developed to bond dissimilar materials and non-metallic materials, such as plastics, composites, and new alloys. Also, advances in laser beam and electron beam welding, new fluxes, and other new technologies and techniques all point to an increasing need for highly trained and skilled workers.

NCCER’s four-level curriculum covers topics such as Oxyfuel Cutting, Welding Symbols, and Stainless Steel Groove Welds. NCCER’s curriculum also correlates to the AWS SENSE (Schools Excelling through national Skills Education) standards and guidelines for Entry Welder. An AWS SENSE correlation chart is provided with the curriculum to assist instructors in complying with the AWS guidelines
To provide training for OSHA’s 10-hour construction industry training program, NCCER developed a Safety Orientation program, which provides employees with best practices for some of the most common and hazardous situations on the job site. Topics covered in this curriculum include Construction Health, Electrical Hazards, and Emergency Response.
Construction project managers plan and direct the building and maintenance of everything from bridges to high-rises to wastewater systems. They usually have the satisfaction of seeing a job through from start to finish. In a typical day, project managers might meet with owners, examine a work breakdown structure (WBS), negotiate with sub-contractors, and directly supervise crews. Their qualifications include both formal education and in- formal on-the-job training, and their knowledge encompasses construction materials and methods, mathematics, communications, safety, human resources, scheduling, and customer service, among other areas.

This one-level curriculum covers topics such as Construction Documents, Resource Control, and Continuous Improvement.

Solar Photovoltaics

The solar power industry is a rapidly growing field that is expected to help ease human dependence on the use of fossil fuels. Solar panels are now rated to produce up to 600 volts of electricity, and the cost of purchasing and installing these panels for residential purposes has been reduced considerably. Because of this, the need for solar photovoltaic installers has increased and is projected to grow with the demand for solar installations.

In response to this demand, NCCER has developed a curriculum for both entry level and advanced solar PV installation technicians – all in support of the North American Board of Energy Practitioners’ (NABCEP’s) educational standards for technicians. This one-level curriculum covers topics such as Introduction to Solar Photovoltaics, System Design, and System Installation.

Drywall

Drywall applicators often install walls and ceilings, as well as place insulation, soundproofing, and firestopping materials behind and onto those walls and ceilings. They may also apply textures and trims to enhance both the interiors and exteriors of the buildings. The two-level curriculum for Drywall covers such subjects as Thermal and Moisture Protection, Steel Framing, and Acoustical Ceilings.

Fashion Design

From the clothes we wear to the homes we live in, fashion and design is all around us. In this course, students who have a flair for fashion or who constantly redecorate their room find out what it is like to work in the design industry by exploring career possibilities and the background needed to pursue them. Students try their hand at designing as they learn the basics of color and design, then test their skills through hands-on projects. In addition, they develop the essential communication skills that build success in any business. By the end of the course, students are well on their way to developing the portfolio needed to get started in this exciting field.

HVAC​

The increasing development of HVAC (heating and air-conditioning systems) technology causes employers to recognize the importance of continuous education and keeping up to speed with the latest equipment and skills. Hence, technical school training or apprenticeship programs often provide an advantage and a higher qualification for employment.
NCCER’s program has been designed by highly qualified subject matter experts with this in mind. Our four levels, North American Technician Excellence (NATE) recognized, present theoretical and practical skills essential to your success as an HVAC installer or technician.

Certificate Programs

Digital Media/Multimedia Technology (60)

Game/Simulation/Animation Visual Design

Music Production Technology


In this introductory course, students learn about the physics of sound and the history of recording technologies. They learn about the four stages of professional music recording projects: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. Using Audacity, an open-source recording and mixing program, they practice the techniques used by sound engineers to produce multitrack recordings. Through a series of engaging hands-on projects, they learn the fundamental concepts of audio engineering.

This introductory design course is for students who want to create compelling, professional-looking graphic designs and photos. Students learn the basics of composition, color, and layout through the use of hands-on projects that allow them to use their creativity while developing important foundational skills. They use GIMP software to create a graphic design portfolio with a wide variety of projects involving the mastery of technical topics, such as working with layers and masks, adding special effects, and effectively using typefaces to create visual impact. The projects help students develop the skills they need to create and edit images of their own.

This course is for anyone who loves gaming and wants to design and build original games from scratch. Students learn how to use popular game-development software to create engaging, interactive games in a variety of styles. After learning about game genres, students learn about all aspects of the game-design process. From there, it's on to a series of increasingly challenging hands-on projects that teach all the elements of successful game development. This course provides a solid foundation in the essentials of game design.

Nursing Assistant 

Child Care Center Operations

  
This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Health Science career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of Health Science career cluster.

This program is designed to prepare students for employment as nursing assistants (SOC 31-1014 Nursing Assistants).

The content includes but is not limited to interpersonal skills, medical terminology, legal and ethical responsibilities, safe and efficient work, gerontology, nutrition, pet-facilitated therapy, health and safety including Cardio-pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) – heart saver level, and employability skills.
  
This program offers a sequence of courses that provides coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in the Education and Training career cluster; provides technical skill proficiency, and includes competency-based applied learning that contributes to the academic knowledge, higher-order reasoning and problem-solving skills, work attitudes, general employability skills, technical skills, and occupation-specific skills, and knowledge of all aspects of the Education and Training career cluster.

The content includes but is not limited to organizational leadership, financial management, legal obligations and responsibilities, educational programming, marketing strategies, assessment, monitoring practices, observations, referrals and collaboration of programs with families and community resources.
  

Business Entrepreneurship

In this introductory business course, students learn the basics of planning and launching their own successful business. Whether they want to start their own money-making business or create a non-profit to help others, this course helps students develop the core skills they need to be successful. They learn how to come up with new business ideas, attract investors, market their business, and manage expenses. Students hear inspirational stories of teen entrepreneurs who have turned their ideas into reality, and then they plan and execute their own business.